Baked goods with egg

Baked goods with egg

My son (12 months) has a documented egg allergy. He has had hives a few times, always from eating or touching scrambled eggs. I did give him baked goods before we knew and he didn't get hives. His allergist said he "probably" can have eggs in baked goods as long as they're baked 350+ for at least 20 minutes.

My question is, how would I know if it was giving him a mild reaction? Just because he didn't get hives doesn't mean his tummy doesn't hurt, right?!

A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

very good question! i was recently tested not allergic to egg whites so i made scrambled eggs and wow i had a really bad reaction (immediate gas and violent diarrhea and stomach pain) but then i tried a hard boiked egg and was ok. Perhaps baking or longer boiling makes a difference! My allergist said sometimes cooking the fruit i am having problems with woukd help But i just have to figure out how without gluten grains seeds nuts soy fish yeast or dairy lol
i hope this helps and i am so glad you love your baby so much

posted 12 months ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

Good question. My allergist told me to try baking my eggs instead of scrambled or boiled.

posted 12 months ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

When we were just finding out about my then kindergartener’s food allergy, she complained of her stomach hurting. Each time she had been exposed since finding out, she has always complained of her stomach. I would suggest to watch out for your sons behavior changing, like his stomach hurts. Ask his doctor for ways they feel may better help you getting him out and socialized with peers his same age.

posted 12 months ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

exposure to heat changes the protein in the eggs, so some people can eat it with no symptoms. but raw or partially cooked eggs can result in a reaction.
Many children outgrow egg, but some few dont. My son has a unusual history with egg, and did at one point outgrow both baked egg allergy and raw egg allergy. He is now allergic to both as an adult. However I think its a very good sign at such a young age that your child can eat baked egg. Its worth investigating idea of a egg ladder trial with a allergy clinic or allergy doc. Or having raw egg challenge in future, if signs of outgrowing persist. I would not do a raw egg challenge at home without being given medical go ahead by a allergy doctor. Please dont consider a true allergy reaction based on just hives, take time to learn the signs of anaphylaxis, so you are prepared and recognise. Also there is many young people with egg allergy often have peanut as an allergen, as there are linking similar shaped proteins. So get medical advice on this as well.Good luck, most children outgrow egg by 5 yrs, so keep up the hope.

posted 9 months ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

Same as what Jennifer said. Stick with the bake for 20 min rule. Start with smaller amounts with a few days in between. Watch for behavior changes. Try bringing it up to what you think is a normal amount for a meal and then more than once in the same day. More, bec the reaction would be more obvious and give you a better sense of his threshold. I play this game with myself constantly. But do so with caution as allergies can be dangerous.

posted 12 months ago
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