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Alpha Gal Allergies

Alpha Gal Allergies

Who has this? Finally requested doctors office blood testing for Lymes. Not sure of that result as it is not available or wasn't ordered however, I tested positive for Alpha Gal. What guidance were you advised besides avoiding Beef Pork and Lamb? Realize this also includes No meats from any hoofed animals including wild game. New journey. Continue eating Medeterrian diet-lifestyle for (our) health issues and easiest for two retirees.

Have Self referred for appointment to allergist for food… read more

A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

This is based on research. It is normally wise to do a elimination diet with a dietician. Most are familiar with the mediterranean diet, but not all understand how to figure out diets for complicated issues. My own diet is complicated due to my many allergies and intolerances, thus I'm used to it. I've also found doctors who are "experts" who have highly recommended the paleo diet. I don't recommend it! Its too restrictive in the wrong way and recommends foods that I don't recommended eating. Pork, for example. Whatever a pig eats, you eat. But, with your conditions, you can't eat pork anyway, or beef, lamb, and so on. Dieticians were taught to be pro-meats, anti-vegan. This is why in your case, I would approach a dietician with caution. A younger one might be better than one who has been in the business for many many years, as old school textbook teaching won't help you here. A vegan dietician, tends to be more up on what veggies contain what to get you a balanced diet. You can then add in fish to whatever recommendations the vegan dietician gives you.

Tick control - they have clothes you can buy, that are pre-sprayed with Permethrin, wich may disable ticks. I would tuck pants into socks. Wearing the netting over your head and the rest of your body also helps. You just need to be sure there are no holes in the netting. TickEncounter org is from the University of Rhode island. They have some information here. I would do both, as Permethrin and netting should really do the trick. You can follow the video on the TickEncounter site, to add your own permetrhin to whatever netting you buy. You do need to put the head net over a hat that has a rigid border or the net is too close to the face and ears. Also, you want a ultra fine mesh. Coghlan does carry the ultra fine mesh head netting, and I have had great success with them. However, I have not used it around no-see-ums, so I can't testify there. Coghlan, you can see out of, and it does get the job done. I would get the ultra fine mesh and their other one that isn't ultra fine and see which one works for you. I'd bring them both with, so that if you are in a no-see-um territory, you can get out of there, switch mesh nets, if need be, and then continue your hiking.

Tough Outdoors on Amazon, carries a Mosquito Head net - Bug face netting for hates, with extra fine mesh. I've looked at it, and it looks like it really would keep out everything! However, visability and heat is an issue as that mesh is really fine. Many have mentioned that in their reviews.

Even Naturals have lots of high reviews, but some have claim that it does not work for no-see-ums, and others claim it works for keeping most of the no-see-ums out. One reviewer claimed that using 2 at the same time worked to keep everything out.
Best wishes!

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

Elimination diet - highly recommend doing this. I would start with 2 vegetables that you are reasonably assured that you are not reacting too. Swiss Chard and Beet green are the ones I would recommend actually, due to their nutritional density and that they are not cruciferous vegetables. These vegetables can not be nightshades! I would season that and the fresh fish you are sure you do not react to, with ONLY Himalayan Pink Salt. This is assuming, you can eat eggs and do eat eggs daily - for the iodine! Cruciferous vegetables daily in too high of an amount, has been known to cause issues with goiters.

Step 2 - If you do not see a reaction after 5 days on that ridiculously restricted diet, then add in turmeric spice. This is a spice highly recommended for Sjogrens syndrome, but could also be contributing to reactions. After 4 days, no reaction, I would add fresh garlic. If bloating occurs, then garlic is off the plate. I would avoid onions too as they are normally more likely to cause bloating.

Step 3 Every 4 days, if no reaction, then add another food or spice. I would try Olive Oil next, only so that you have oil in your diet. We all need healthy fats and I know Olive oil is key ingredient in mediterranean cooking. Then, I would go to the list from the search mentioned below, and nab a copy of the pdf file. I would then start at the top of the list and work your way down, through the vegetables to see if you react or not. I would only add in another spice (outside of parsley,as parsley is high on the list and should be tried sooner) after getting a good assortment of vegetables and fish you can eat. Sweet Basil I would try next, then oregano, cilantro, black pepper (Tellicherry).

Do a search for "list of the most nutrient dense foods cdc gov" The top link should be a CDC page by J Di Noia. This list is invaluable for nutrients. Where I live, we hare nutrient defiicient because our diet is too high in vegetables not even on the list - corn, potatoes, green beans. Sure, they do have good nutrition (not corn, but the others), and we do want them on our plates. But, the other vegetables are better to include daily.

I would also get a list of the cruciferous vegetables so that you can limit them. Chinese Cabbage - Napa cabbage or bok choy, are way better than the American cabbage. However, I love a bit of red cabbage in my eggs in the morning, which has a 24.51 ranking.

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

First off, I would immediately give up all nightshades, dairy, cereal grains for a period of 6 months. This means no cayenne, paprika, chili powder, bell peppers, potatoes, tomatoes, pimento, and so on. I would also give up caffeine (coffee, black tea), chocolate, corn. I would go lower salt, but not too low! They have found, depending on which researchers you listen too, that too low of a salt diet is just as bad as too high of a salt diet. Eggs contain Iodine and is a better source. Eggs and tuna are also rich in selenium. I'd get fresh tuna, not canned.

Researchers who have been completely ignored by most doctors, found that foods that cause acid reflux is an allergic reaction. The list I gave you above will help reduce the acid reflux reaction. The dairy ban, will help with the phlegm and mucus issues. Cereal grains ban, will help heal the gut. This ban is only for 6 months. I would permanently keep the rest off of your plate, except I would try bell peppers after 6 months and see if you react or not with acid reflux. I would then try potato the following week, to see if you react.

I would highly recommend veggie smoothies every day. Watercress and Napa cabbage contain the highest vitamin and mineral content but are cruciferous so I would only do a small amount of those. Swiss Chard, Beet Green, Chicory and Spinach is also very high in nutrient density, so better to use in a smoothie with thyroid issues. Leaf lettuce, parsley and romaine lettuce also scored well, in that order.

Spices - If you didn't make, you don't eat it. Paprika, chili powder, cayenne can be in anything Deviled eggs are off the plate. Usually it contains paprika. Paprika is that nightshade that taste great but can be problematic.

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

see where i went with that for insurace purposes.?

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyFoodAllergyTeam Member said:

i have and there are more than one type of lymes test which is why they get so pissy. u have to press and guess oh happy joy and salutations. now my dr wants proof. he actually wants me to bring the ticks into his office.im considering just catching a few to get my test done sneaky huh?

posted almost 2 years ago
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